Navigation (Space)

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Navigation is the way in which a course is read or driven by a vehicle. In the case of WNOHGB, a way to move a ship from point A to point B, or the process of determining such a route.

Contents

Navigational Commands

This is a list and short description of all navigational commands:

Movement / Headings

heading <yaw> <pitch> -- Sets the ship's heading.
cheading <rel_yaw> [<rel_pitch>] -- Sets heading using arguments as relative heading to current.
layin <x> <y> <z> -- Sets the ship's destination.
inter <contact> -- Sets ship's destination to contact's position and sets heading to contact's bearing.
warp <factor> -- Sets ship's warp speed.
impulse <%> -- Set ship's impulse speed.

Arrival / Departure

dock <contact> -- Docks ship at contact.
undock -- Undocks ship.
land <contact>[:<landing pad>] -- Lands ship on contact. If <landing pad> is specified, it lands ship at the specified pad and not the first pad located on <contact>.
launch -- Launches ship if ship is landed.
list <ports/pads/landed/docked> -- Lists ports where ship is docked, pads where ship is landed, what ships are landed on ship, and what ships are docked at ship.
connect <port> -- Connects the ship's airlock to the specified port (port list found in 'list ports').
disconnect -- Disconnects the ship's airlock.

Sensors / Navigational Information

scan -- Gives a sensor report.
plot <contact> -- Estimates <contact>'s destination.
navinfo -- Gives ship's navigation status.
eta [at <warp>] -- Gives eta to ship's destination. (Uses ship's current speed if warp is not specified)
borderscan -- Gives a report on nearby borders and territories.

Autopilot

(Use at your own risk.)
autopilot <contact/x y z/mem <nav>/off> -- If <contact> is specified, it lays in the contact's coordinates as the destination and turns autopilot on. If <x y z> is specified, it makes that your destination and turns autopilot on. 'autopilot off' deactivates autopilot. If 'mem' is entered as the first argument, <nav> will be compared against the ship's navigational computer and appropriate coordinates will be relayed to autopilot.

Headings

From the RealSpace Glossary:

Heading: The course or direction in which a ship is moving. Defined as two coordinates (horizontal,vertical). The horizontal angle (yaw) indicates how far left or right the ship is facing (ie 0 would be forward, 90 would be right, 180 backwards, 270 left). The vertical angle indicates how the ship is heading on the Z axis (up/down). The vertical angle (pitch) can be from 90 (straight up) to 0 (level) then to -90 (straight down).

Here are a few example headings:

Heading 0 0 -- Going along the positive X axis (galactic North). The first coordinate in the ship's position will increase.
Heading 90 0 -- Going along the positive Y axis (galactic East). The second coordinate of the ship's position will increase.
Heading 180 0 -- Going along the negative X axis (galactic South). The first coordinate in the ship's position will decrease.
Heading 270 0 -- Going along the negative Y plane (galactic West). The second coordinate of the ship's position will decrease.

Heading 0 90 -- Straight up the Z axis. The third coordinate in the ship's position will increase.
Heading 0 -90 -- Going straight down along the negative Z axis. The third coordinate in the ship's position will decrease.

Heading 45 45 -- Going diagonally to the right and pitched up 45 degrees (diagonally up). All coordinates in the ship's position will increase.
Heading 225 -45 -- Opposite of heading 45 45.

Notes: When the pitch is 90 or -90, the yaw cannot be anything other than 0.

See Also

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